Growing Hints

Here is a PDF of the information handed out from our world famous guest speaker on Mycorrhizae.

RIBEIRO-003

 

 

This page includes general growing instruction for Dahlias in the Northwest

To read the Kitsap County Dahlia Society Growing Guide click here
After the file opens click the rotate clockwise arrow to make it easier to read.
After you have finished reading click your browser’s BACK arrow to get back to this web page.

NOTE: it is a PDF file, if you do not have Acrobat Reader see below.
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Planting Instructions

1. The time to plant in Kitsap county area is after the last frost, between
April 15 and June 1.
2. Check your soil for proper moisture. It is better to plant when the soil
is a bit dry.
3. Place stakes where tubers are to be planted.
4. Remove about 5 inches of soil; put in the hole and mix in
2 TBS of I0-20-20 fertilizer
1 tsp. Epson Salt
2 tsp bone meal
5. Place tuber flat with eye up, near the stake. Cover the tuber with about
1 inch of soil.
6. Slugs like young dahlia shoots; use slug bait as necessary.

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Disbudding and Suckering

When the plant is about 15 inches tall, it will set a terminal flower bud. Remove this bud and any small buds next to it. Doing so will improve plant growth and allow the plant to develop a strong vegetative system for supporting the flowers that will appear later. When the next flower buds appear and reach diameter of 1/4 inch, there will be two small buds next to them. Remove these two buds gently with tweezers or your fingers. Also remove the axillary buds or suckers that appear in the axil or angle of the leaves and stem at the two nodes immediately below the flower buds.

The information will be in a PDF format and you will need
Acrobat Reader to read it. If you do not have Acrobat
Reader click here and it will take you to the Adobe web
site for a free download of the Acrobat Reader program.

There is an excellent web site on Digging, Dividing and Storing Dahlia
Tubers by Ben Lawrence complete with pictures at www.dahlias.net/dahwebpg/TuberStor/TuberStor1.htm